A Muscari floral iPhone photograph processed with multiple iPhoneography apps to add numerous textured layers and generate a unique distressed finish.

App stacking gives a unique finish by disguising the source of the textured layers.

Spring has well and truly arrived when the Muscari come out. These beautiful flowers thrive, spread and naturalise anywhere and because they are so common often it’s a case of not seeing the wood for the trees. I think these blooms are incredibly striking. Bring a specimen indoors and you can suddenly appreciate the form and structure of the flower and appreciate what a stunning still life specimen it makes.

iPhone photography apps used:

muscari textured floral - iPhoneography

{ muscari textured floral }

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Process and apps used

ProCamera 7 ~ initial capture with back-light through a translucent window. Exposure was adjusted to avoid a silhouette effect by setting and locking exposure in a darker area before returning to capture the subject:

This enabled the window to be ‘blown out’ and exposed the subject more accurately. ProCamera 7 is particularly responsive when setting and locking focus and exposure points :

procamera7 - manually set and lock exposure


Handy Photo ~ The composition of my capture required me to extend my canvas to make a square image rather than crop it. I could add canvas in Filterstorm or Filterstorm Neue but instead to automatically clone the additional canvas with the surrounding image I use the Handy Photo Magic crop tool:

I did a short video demonstration of this functionality in my iPhone photography tip { extend canvas and auto clone } article (video embedded below):

handy photo - magic crop

Around 2 minutes long including introductions:

 


Snapseed ~ Drama Bright 2 preset filter applied. As standard as with all ‘drama’ filters this de-saturates the image. I adjust the filter back to a neutral saturation level:

The effect is quite subtle but it adds sharpness, lightness and definition to key areas of the image:

snapseed - drama / bright 2 / saturation neutral


Snapseed ~ the background needs some manual tidying up. I therefore use Snapseed’s excellent selective adjust tool a number of times within a single process to whiten the background by adjusting brightness and contrast:

This is { image one }:

Screen Grab

snapseed - selctive adjust / brightness / contrast


Superimpose ~ Sometimes it’s good fun to have a little doodle so I imported the image into Superimpose as both foregound and background and blended it as ‘Difference’ at 50pct transparency (within the transform menu):

superimpose - difference


Snapseed ~ I don’t make too much use of the Retrolux set of filters, generally my initial iPhoneography texture will be a Snapseed grunge texture. However, still doodling I import the image into Snapseed and apply the Retrolux style 2 filter which I manually adjust slightly to taste:

snapseed - retrolux - style 2


Oggl ~ The next iPhone app I use to add texture is the Hipstamatic Yoona lens and Blanko 1 film combination via Oggl:

Hipstamatic lens and film combinations have to be set before the image is captured. Oggl is a companion iPhoneography app which allow me to import my lens and film purchases from Hipstamatic and apply them retrospectively in post processing:

This is { image two }:

oggl - yoona lens / blanko 1 film


Modern Grunge ~ with all my recent attention on the excellent Mextures and Stackables texture blending iPhoneography apps, I decide to use another favourite of mine for the next texture in the app stacking process Modern Grunge:

I already have some formulas created from previous projects and I select one of my favourites:

This is { image three }:

modern grunge - saved preset

Sticking with the Spring time theme, at this stage the image has been trashed. Very much like the early stages of an annual Spring clean things always look worse before they look better . The fact that I have various clean versions of the image enables me to add detail back and reintroduce definition.


Superimpose ~ iPhoneography image three is imported as the background with iPhoneography image two as the foreground. The two layers are blended under ‘hard light’ (transform menu) with transparency set at around 35pct:

superimpose - hard light


Superimpose ~ the resulting image is flattened into a background layer using the flatten tool within the transform menu (this cannot be undone). iPhoneography image one is imported as the foreground layer and the two layers blended under ‘darken’ with a transparency at around 50pct:

superimpose - darken


Superimpose ~ the resulting image is flattened into a background layer using the flatten tool within the transform menu (this cannot be undone). iPhoneography image one is once again imported as the foreground layer:

The final stage is to add back more of the vase detail. I create a mask so that only the bottom left corner of the foreground layer is active using a combination of the brush and linear gradient tools (masks menu) and then blend the layers together under ‘multiply’ at full strength (transform menu):

Screen Grab

muscari textured floral - iPhoneography


 

Get the iPhoneography apps mentioned in this article

  • ProCamera7 my preferred everyday camera replacement app

  • Handy Photo is a general editing app with many filters and textures. I use it primarily for textures and for the magic crop functionality

  • Snapseed a must have free iPhoneography app (Originally by Nik now owned by Google)

  • Superimpose my personal go to app for layers masking and blending processes

  • Oggl – recommended with its parent app Hipstamatic

  • Modern Grunge one of my favourite texturing iPhoneography apps


 

I hope you enjoyed my iPhone photography texture app stacking workflow. Thank you for reading and I hope to see you again.

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Shortlink: http://wp.me/p31VpY-1xJ


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3 Comments

  1. rosaleen says:

    another excellent tutorial Paul. u make it all so easy to follow cause u detail every step in a clear and concise manner

  2. […] A Muscari floral iPhone photograph processed with multiple iPhoneography apps to add numerous textured layers and generate a unique distressed finish.  […]

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