iPhoneography tutorial which was initially intended to look at motion blur. The nature of the image I wanted to work on means that I also look at cloning to clean up an unfortunate composition together with masking and blending to reintroduce colour.

 

Definitions / Uses

‘Motion blur’ in mobile photography

Motion blur using the iPhone

I started looking at motion blur at both capture and post processing in my iPhone photography tutorial – texture blend app stacking.

I have been playing a lot recently with motion blur.

At capture motion blur will generally satisfy one of five main requirements:

  • Capture the movement occurring around a static subject with a motionless iPhone (this example).

  • Emphasise the speed of a moving subject by panning and blurring the background, or

  • emphasise the speed of a moving subject by maintaining a static background and allowing the subject to move through the scene. The light trail effect of long exposure night photography is one example of this.

  • Distort an image by moving the iPhone while capturing a static scene.

  • A ‘happy accident’ achieved through some random combination of these techniques.

The motion blur effect can also be added to a sharp image in post processing.


 

‘Cloning’ in mobile photography

Cloning in an image is simply the process of copying one area of the image across to another area.

Cloning using Filterstorm

I looked in more detail at cloning with Filterstorm in my tutorial iPhone photography – street style with cloning and perspective correction.

Most typically (as in this case) cloning is used to paint over distracting elements in an image that the photographer would like removed. It can however be a valuable artistic tool to copy elements – for example create a twin of a person in an image. Possibilities are really limited only by imagination.


 

‘Layering masking and blending’ in mobile photography

Layering masking and blending

A number of iPhone photography workflows looking specifically at these techniques can be viewed via my iPhone photography – layers, masking and blending tutorials.

Layering masking and blending is the process of combining multiple images or elements from multiple images to form a single composition. It is an area I have looked at in some detail on a number of occasions.

In this case, layers, masking and blending are used to combine specific elements from the same image to reintroduce colour to the central figure.


 

iPhone photography apps used:

people watching

{ people watching }

By

 

Process and apps used

Slow Shutter Cam ~ initial capture with shutter speed set at 0.5 seconds. The iPhone was held static with a central static subject and movement of other subjects through the scene.

An awful lot of iPhone apps will be returned if you search for ‘slow shutter’. The one I tend to use is properly titled ‘Slow Shutter Cam’ by Cogitap Software:

slow shutter cam - motion blur


Filterstorm ~ I like the effect but there is a massive issue with this image. My main subject appears to have a very nasty growth emerging from her eyes:

Filterstorm has always been my preferred cloning tool. I therefore clone away the distraction to create a more satisfactory base image:

filterstorm - clone

A short section from a previous video showing Filterstorm cloning functionality in action. See the full article at iPhone photography – street style with cloning and perspective correction.

 


Snapseed ~ the image was cropped with a 1:1 ratio and a slight reduction in the height to center the subject. At this stage it is handy to know what atmosphere or style you are looking for in the finished image. I’m going for a vintage painted feel and so adjustments such as ‘shadows’, ‘contrast’ and ‘Ambiance’ are all made from the ‘Tune image’ section. I also think about ‘sharpness’ and ‘structure’ from the ‘details’ menu:

snapseed - tune image


Oggl ~ having created a base ‘vintage’ image without applying any pre-created vintage filters I remove all the colour and create a nice vintage base effect by bringing the image into Oggl.

I select the classic John S Lens together with the Uchitel 20 Film:

This film is inspired by the instant photography of Argentinian-born photographer Deigo Uchitel:

oggl - john s lens / uchitel 20 film


Superimpose ~ My final requirement is to reintroduce the colour to the main static figure. I achieve this by importing the Oggl image as the background and the Snapseed image as the foreground:

I work with the magic wand and brush and eraser tools to mask the figure completely. I then invert the mask so that everything except the figure is masked on the Snapseed version.

The two layers are blended under the ‘color’ method at 50pct transparency:

people watching

A short section from a previous video showing Superimpose masking (including inverting masks) and blending functionality in action. See the full article at iPhoneography workflow { autumn walk }.

 


 

Alternative motion blur effects

Moving the iPhone to distort a static image:

This was captured using a standard camera replacement app in low light conditions. The iPhone is capable of low shutter speeds in low light as standard. In the correct conditions motion blur of this type can be achieved without a specialist app.

no escape

{ no escape }

 

Panning the iPhone to track a moving subject and motion blur the background:

This was captured using a standard camera replacement app in very bright light. Even with quite a high shutter speed, the iPhone’s 30mm(ish) equivalent focal range means that getting close to a fast moving object to fill the frame will create enough panning speed to capture significant motion blur. Given the deep depth of field (depth of focus) motion blur is one of the few options available straight out of camera to highlight the foreground subject by blurring the background.

cyclist

{ cyclist }


 

Get the iPhoneography apps mentioned in this article

  • Slow Shutter Cam to capture the image at a low shutter speed creating motion blur in bright light

  • Filterstorm to clone out the unfortunate issue in the background of the initial capture

  • Snapseed a must have free iPhoneography app (Originally by Nik now owned by Google). Used in this article to crop and then adjust various levels and give the image its initial vintage look

  • Oggl used to give the image its canvas and the basis of the vintage appearance. Recommended with its parent app Hipstamatic

  • Superimpose my personal go to app for layers masking and blending processes. Used in this article to reintroduce colour on a selective basis and further enhance the vintage look


 

I hope you enjoyed my iPhone photography vintage motion blur workflow. Thank you for reading and I hope to see you again.

Skip


 

Shortlink: http://wp.me/p31VpY-1AB


Related articles

If this article was of interest then these articles may also prove helpful.



6 Comments

  1. […] iPhoneography tutorial using motion blur, cloning and blending layers with masks to create a selectively re-coloured painterly vintage style iPhone image.  […]

  2. […] iPhoneography tutorial using motion blur, cloning and blending layers with masks to create a selectively re-coloured painterly vintage style iPhone image. The post iPhone photography tutorial – motion blur appeared first on Skipology.  […]

  3. […] iPhoneography tutorial using motion blur, cloning and blending layers with masks to create a selectively re-coloured painterly vintage style iPhone image.  […]

  4. Marsha says:

    I love your motion blurs…especially the “no escape” one…
    I can do panning to get background blurs but still haven’t been able to capture shots like “no escape”

  5. […] People watching is a long exposure (0.5 secs) capture with Slow Shutter Cam. My main subject remained stationary whilst other people move through the scene. I used a table to steady the phone during capture but a tripod or similar would be helpful in more exposed areas. If interested in the full edit for this image, it can be viewed here. […]

  6. […] endroits plus exposés. Si le processus de modification de cette image vous intéresse, vous pouvez ici le voir dans son […]

Leave a Comment