Ready for a really obvious statement? “Happy accidents are more likely to occur if you take more images with your iPhone”. Wise words eh!

I think there’s more to it than that though.

There is a well known quote and one that sticks with me in all that I do. There are various versions and attributions so let’s just agree that I was the first to say it…

 

The more I practice, the luckier I get.

unattributed

 

That’s all fine and dandy for those happy accidents I get lucky with at capture but what about generating a few iPhoneography happy accidents in post processing? What about all those bland images I’ve cast aside but not got around to deleting and still litter my camera roll? I think some of those are ideal fodder for iphoneography happy accidents in post processing.

I have used the phrase happy accident in a few articles. For example in my article on mextures I say…

 

Happy accidents

I really enjoy messing around with the same or similar versions of an image – sometimes interesting happy accidents occur, especially when looking at the ‘exclusion’ and ‘difference’ blend methods in the region of 50pct transparency.

 

The ultimate post processing happy accident though is complete randomisation of all elements. Most of my workflows are all about control. Actually the process of taking screen grabs or making notes to record my processes can be restrictive. Randomisation for me is a wonderful release. It feels like a pressure valve venting tension and frustration.

 

iPhone photography apps used:

clown - diana multiple exposure

{ clown }

By

 

Process and apps used

This article by definition isn’t a workflow. The word ‘work’ should not be anywhere near it. The iPhone photography app involved is Diana. It’s not a complicated app and unfortunately at the time of writing it only generates images at a low resolution. However, because of its impact on my well-being I forgive it that shortcoming.

 

i want to be a tree

{ i want to be a tree }

 

Diana can be used to capture double exposures directly but I prefer to use her for those happy accidents from my camera roll. You can do this either totally manually or totally randomly with various levels of control inbetween. For example you can:

 

  • Either shake the iPhone or tap the dice to allow Diana to randomly import 2 images from your camera roll and select a random blend effect. The result is a totally random image. It may be a happy accident or a sad accident. That is an individual aesthetic decision.

  • Having generated a random starting result, it may show promise but not feel quite right. You can therefore swap the first exposure with the second exposure to test how that impacts the result. The impact will vary depending on the blend effect.

  • Possibly the images selected feel good but the blend effect doesn’t quite do it for you. You can therefore swipe through the blend effects and see how each effect alters the image. There are some wildly different results.

  • You may like one of the images randomly selected but not the other. You can tap and hold the exposure you like to lock it and hit the dice again to allow Diana to randomly select another exposure and blend effect.

  • At the totally manual end of the process you can select each image and the blend effect with no levels of randomness involved. Even the opacity of each exposure can be controlled by sliding scale giving a maximum level of control


 

Some more examples

ghosts

{ ghosts }


 

window shopping

{ window shopping }


 

west end projection

{ west end projection }


 

Get the iPhoneography apps mentioned in this article

Apps used in this article:


 

I hope you enjoyed my iPhone photography thoughts on letting go once in a while and releasing that iPhoneography pressure valve. Thank you for reading and thank you Diana for being there when I need you. I hope to see you again soon.

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Shortlink: http://wp.me/p31VpY-1Di




10 Comments

  1. I love the Diana Photo app! Your results are beautiful!

  2. David Graham says:

    Great article, as usual! I happen to know the origin of that wonderful quotation, “the more I practice, the luckier I get.” It’s attributed to the golf great Jack Nicklaus. It’s what he supposedly said when someone remarked on an amazing shot he’d made, saying “That was a lucky shot.”

    • Paul Brown says:

      Thank you David. That’s exactly what I thought but when I searched to just double check there seemed to be a little confusion. I think that’s a fair attribution though for sure.

  3. Marsha says:

    Love the Diana app…just got the Android version yesterday and am playing alot with it. Didn’t realize it makes a difference which order the photo goes…will have to play with this.

  4. Myrna says:

    I so identify with your editing/processing thoughts! And love your results!

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